The Rochester Panel (detail), Utah, 2012

The Rochester Panel (detail), Utah, 2012

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.

The Rochester Panel (detail), Utah, 2012

The Rochester Panel (detail), Utah, 2012

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.

The Rochester Panel (detail), Utah, 2012

The Rochester Panel (detail), Utah, 2012

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.

Martha's Butte, Arizona, 2014

Martha's Butte, Arizona, 2014

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.

Puerco Ridge, Arizona, 2014

Puerco Ridge, Arizona, 2014

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.

Puerco Ridge, Arizona, 2014

Puerco Ridge, Arizona, 2014

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.

Tuteveni Rock, Arizona, 2011

Tuteveni Rock, Arizona, 2011

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.

Grapevine Canyon, Nevada, 2011

Grapevine Canyon, Nevada, 2011

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.

Horseshoe Canyon, Utah, 2012

Horseshoe Canyon, Utah, 2012

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.

Moab, Utah, 2012

Moab, Utah, 2012

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.

Legend Rock, Wyoming, 2013

Legend Rock, Wyoming, 2013

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.

Legend Rock, Wyoming, 2013

Legend Rock, Wyoming, 2013

I first began to visit petroglyph and pictograph sites with my friend, the artist Robert Seydel. Sometimes we would have good directions to a site and find the images easily. Other times we would walk for hours, eyes peeled, trying to intuit where these artists, about whom we know so little, would have chosen to peck (or paint) their magical pictures. The thrill, on finding an unexpected panel, or an image in the most perfect of locations is intoxicating, and keeps one going back, looking for more.

The photographs can't replicate the wonder that comes with seeing the images in situ, however I hope that they suggest the range and power—the mesmerizing qualities—of the extraordinary (relatively unknown) accumulation of pictures left on patinated rock faces and on the walls of caves in the American West.